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timovuorensola2Timo Vuorensola doesn’t need long introductions. He’s known especially for directing movies and being a member of Älymystö.

Mesikämmen decided to ask few questions from Timo. In the following interview Star Wreck, Iron Sky, Laibach, Älymystö, Nazi UFO’s, Nazi’s in movies, Sarah Palin and her supporters, Pekka Siitoin, and many other subjects are covered.

Ladies and gentlemen, Timo Vuorensola speaks!

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Background

If this interview could take place anywhere, anytime, real or imaginary, where would we sit now making this interview?

I’d pick some nice, cozy pub in Tharbad, Cardolan. That’s in Middle-Earth, of course. And year would be around 1650 Third Age.

Who are you, what do you do? What did you do before Iron Sky that made you a celebrity?

I’m some kind of a all-round-random-shit -guy who just ended up focusing on film. I’ve been interested in anything, from writing to music, from graphics to marketing, and have done a many jobs on each of those fields. I used to be a telemarketer before I started filmmaking and financed my ass during the the making of my first film, Star Wreck: In the Pirkinning.

What made you start Star Wreck-movies? Were you a typical Star Trek-fan?

I wasn’t the brains behind Star Wreck-series, before I met him, Samuli Torssonen from Tampere who had been working on Star Wrecks all his life. I joined in first as an actor to Star Wreck V: Lost Contact -short film, and he asked me – because I was always loud and buzzing about the set – to direct the second. I hadn’t directed anything of that scale before, but decided to take the “job” (not like anyone was paying…).

Regarding Star Trek, I hand’t seen even one full Star Trek episode before I started working on Star Wreck, and didn’t get around to watch the series until years after I had already finished my work on Star Wreck. Maybe it was good, brought the film a bit above the typical fanwank level of fan films on the Internet.

Who are your favorite Star Trek characters and why? The first or the next generation? Deep space nine?

Now that I’ve seen every episode of Star Trek (me and my girlfriend took a 1,5 year Star Trek marathon, watching every episode (729 episodes) and every movie (11 movies then), I find myself a “first generation” -guy, meaning the Original Series is the one that speaks loudest to me, although every other series have had their awesome bits. And out of all the characters in Star Trek, I’d go picking Kirk, Spock, Data and Archer. They all are interesting, stand-alone characters that really bring incredible flavour to the series.

What are your all time favorite movies and directors, top 10? Why these directors, movies?

Top-10 is rather hard, but let’s give it a go:

1. David Lynch – For the freedom of expression.

2. Ridley Scott – For the science fiction mindset.

3. James Cameron – For the beyond-this-world visions.

4. Stanley Kubrick – For the best films I’ve seen in my life.

5. Gus van Sant – For the challenging topics he tackles with such ease.

6. John Cameron Mitchell – For the best film I’ve seen in my life (Hedwig and the Angry Inch).

7. Peter Jackson – For being the guy I want to be one day.

8. Darren Aronofsky – For the darkness, and the light at the end of the tunnel, that turns out to be a train of horrors roaring at you.

9. Steven Spielberg – For my childhood.

10. Terry Gilliam – For taking us on a ride out of this world.

ironskytroopers

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Iron Sky and things related

Where were the seeds of the Iron Sky planted? I recall some mentions about sauna…

Yeah, we were sitting in a sauna, a bunch of us, and friend of ours, one of the writers of Star Wreck: In the Pirkinning suggested we should do a film about Moon Nazis. He had been reading bout this conspiracy theory and thought it might turn into something interesting. First we of course were just laughing about it, but the more we thought about the topic, read about it and researched it, the more we realised there could be a story there.

Turun Hengentieteen Seura made notions about sending metaphysical magical signals into the collective field of human consciousness as the real origin for Iron Sky. What is the truth about the matter? Did you feel some odd itching in your head when the idea came to you?

Yeah, but we believed it to be just dirty nerd sweat exiting our bodies in the heat of the sauna, but apparently, well, that’s what it was then.

ironskyufosWhat do you think of the Nazi-UFO-mythos in general? What do you think, is there is any base to Nazi’s having had man-made UFO’s?

Absolutely, there’s quite a lot of photographic evidence of a saucer-shaped ships being tested by Nazi scientists and later these researches found their way to USA where they were taken even further. I assume the problem eventually was that there was no way to create an energy source that could take the advantage of the saucer shape, and the research was abandoned, after Roswell accident, and all the focus was put into building a space rocket based on V2 technology.

Your take on UFO’s in general?

Whatever saucer-shaped there’s flying it’s man-made. I’m also a firm believer in life outside of our solar system, even ponder it’s possible to think there could be a form of intelligence, but I highly doubt we’ll ever have any contact with anything more than few worms buried in Mars and weird fishy things in Europa. So, in that way I believe we Earthlings should use our imagination as wide, far and crazy as possible in imagining conscious life out there, since we’ll never find it out anyway.

Why does Nazi aesthetics appeal to the people? What’s the reason behind their appeal to the people nowadays? What do you think of Nazis? Was was the worst and the best in them in your books?

Strength and cool come from strong will and great taste in the visuals. Unfortunately, what’s driving these is an ideology that’s so badly rotten inside it’s not worth celebrating. But Nazi cool can be thanked only by Hollywood film industry, which put these soldiers in pedestal and made them demigods of evil. Mankind loves evil, so we love nazis. What’s always forgotten, and what’s very sad is that Nazis were not ‘evil’, they were just pathetic ignorant mislead shitheads. But you can’t really make a multi-billion branch of entertainment industry based on hunting pathetic ignorant mislead shitheads, they are not fun. Evil is much more fun. Making nazis evil you make them entertaining and making them entertaining you make people want to watch them and pay for them.

What I believe how Nazis should be treated is to be revealed as the pathetic ignorant mislead shitheads they are, so no more people want to follow them, because, who wants to identify being a pathetic ignorant mislead shithead?

ironskynazis

I recall there has been some problems in getting the movie distributed, etc. Tell us about that. It must have dealt with the Nazi-dimension of the movie, right?

In the beginning, people were very worried about how we will approach the topic of Nazism, given its’ strong negative baggage, so we did get a lot of interest but a lot of “no thank yous” in the end. It took years of convincing for people to understand that this is a comedy, that it’s dismantling the Nazi mythos not appraising it, and that it’s not making fun of the victims of the Nazis. After this was managed to be slammed into the heads of people, getting the distributors was a bit easier, but for a small marginal european scifi film, it’s never easy.

Eventually, we succeeded, selling the film to theatres in over 60 countries with DVD and VOD finding its’ way to even more. The film is somehow still coming out here and there; just last weekend Hungary released the film to theatres, so there’s some serious longevity in the film.

ironskysarahpalinHave Sarah Palin supporters contacted you regarding the movie? What have they said?

It took them about six months to really form an intelligible response to the film, and it contained a lot of death threats, curse words and Euro-bashing. It was probably one of the best times I’ve had as a filmmaker, reading as some right-wing nutcase found out about Iron Sky, tweeted about it and then the whole republican media on Internet went nuclear.

How you got Laibach to make the soundtrack to Iron Sky? Were they instanty all in for it or was it a matter of negotiations or some such process? Were you a Laibach fan before the movie, an NSK-citizen?

I’ve never been an NSK citizen, but was a big big fan of Laibach since I first found out about them, and was listening to them constantly as I was working and writing Iron Sky. It was one of the initial goals for me production-wise, to get Laibach to do the music, and although contacting them and the initial negotiations were not easy, as soon as we got a chance to meet and talk what the film will be, and how it will be like, they decided to help. And when Laibach is on board, they are on board 150%, and will pull in every resource and bit of energy they have to create something extraordinary.

What do you think of the reception the movie has got? How do you feel about it?

Reception has been mixed. I usually think it’s divided into those with IQ under 100 or above 100. Those above seem to be more likely to get it, those under seem to have hard time getting their heads around it. And, well, of course there’s the film critics, but then again, who cares of them anyway? I’m happy the right people find the film, and I’m happy it has created a huge, intense following that’s going to help us making the sequel, and I promise even the sequel won’t even try to make everyone happy.

ironskylaibachWhat do you think of the movie yourself? What could have been done better, what ended up perfect?

I’m proud and happy of it. Looking back, the more I see what choices we made during the production, the less I think something could’ve been done different. Films are more than sum of their parts, and the magic happens not only as it is written, but also in certain time and space, where no other end result could’ve come out. I could go back and chance this and that, but I fear it would result in a worse film. To me, Iron Sky is perfect as it is, with all its’ flaws, and I wouldn’t really go changing too much. I would’ve liked to stay in the Moon Base a bit more, but we really had to get going with the story around 29 minutes, when we leave the base for the first time.

The movie must have brought you into many interesting situatons. Do you have some special stories to share with us about those? The most surprising, memorable, weird situations?

I’ve had great time with the film’s release. Travelling to tens of film festivals all over the world you get to meet the most amazing people, most interesting world views and end up into strangest situations. Let’s just say I’ve understood that there’s no glamour in film, but there’s something very wicked, dark and perverted in the world of film that’s rather interesting. Weirdest people I’ve met are usually the UFO freaks thanking me for a great documentary.

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Älymystö

What is Älymystö all about?

alymystoÄlymystö an industrial noise project me and Mr. Haapanen set up some 12 years ago. Our intention was originally only to do few songs and one live show, but it grew out of its’ proportions, and although we haven’t released a lot, and haven’t toured like animals, we’ve established a small niche of which we are proud, and which we are also expanding on nowadays.

What made you interested in industrial music? The biggest influences? Top ten best industrial albums – or other kinds of albums, if you prefer to broaden the question?

Industrial music is also a glance into the dark side of electronic music and metal music, sort of like looking under the hood of what this shit is made of. It has beauty in the crust, rot and malfunctions, and it’s very digiprimitive in its’ nature. Top ten industrial albums listed here:

Laibach: Opus Dei.

GGFH: Disease.

Ministry: Psalm 69.

Die Krupps: II.

Alec Empire: Futurist.

Godflesh: Pure.

Pitchshifter.

Front Line Assembly: Hard Wired.

NON: Music for Iron Youth.

You ”sing” and write lyrics for Älymystö. What inspires your lyrics? What do you want or aim to express via them?

Usually sexual frustration, religious frustration, murder fantasies and some kind of a compilation of these elements.

If you would be either a musician or a movie director (not both) which one you would be?

Musician.

The best Älymystö album to date, and why that?

Atomgrad is our only full-length album so far, and I’m proud of it. It has a very unique atmosphere that’s unrepeatable.

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Pekka Siitoin

siitoinufoWhat do you think of Pekka Siitoin? What do you think was the best and the worst in the man? What do you think of him, in general?

I think Finland needs these strong personalities, whatever side of the imaginary ‘fence’ they stand. We tend to be a society which ridicules and abhors anyone with unique personality and see standing out as a negative trait. I’m talking of Pekka Siitoin, but also of Spede Pasanen, Lenita Airisto, Jörn Donner and Matti Nykänen to name a few. All of these are interesting people, some are creepy, some just plain insane and some considered intellectuals. What I like about them all is that they give a nice kick in the ass of us Finns, forces us to think beyond the “kahvia-ja-pullaa” universe we so easily float in. So, I don’t agree with Pekka’s views at all, but I respect his uniqueness.

Did you consider having Pekka Siitoin as a character in Iron Sky at any point? Do you consider doing so in the sequel of the movie that is in planning?

Yes, actually we did, at least partially. In the very first draft of Iron Sky, there was supposed to be a character called Pekka Lehto on the Moon, playing much similar character as Klaus Adler is now. His name comes from a Pekka Siitoin – Seppo Lehto -mash-up, and he was to be a crazy son of a bitch nazi, main antagonist of the film. This was a bit before Johanna Sinisalo joined us, though.

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Keys of success, future, etc.

As a creative and successful person, what kind of advice you would give to persons wishing to create something like Star Wreck or Iron Sky? What are the ingredients of success, of making it all come true today? What you would have done differently if you would have had some advice in the early stages of your process? Or is is all just ”try and see”-kind of process?

I like to say that there’s really nothing you can take or achieve to have the qualifications to make a feature film, other than making it. So, I’d suggest evaluate your life and think, would you be willing to do years of work without being paid to become a filmmaker. Most wouldn’t, and that narrows it down to those would. Then, making a film itself is obviously the main task, and only very few really get to finish. And out of those who finish, even smaller portion are willing to do the work it takes to make a film.

First film doesn’t have to be great in every respect, but it needs to show you have the guts to finish a feature film, you have some kind of a vision on what you are doing. So, instead of talking about it, start making a film. And instead of skipping the corners, spend years on it to make it as good as you humanely can. Then, release it and see what happens.

What you would like people to know about you that they haven’t got to know about you thus far via mainstream media?

I’m an egoistic asshole. It helps repositioning me in the field of who’s a great guy and who’s not. I am.

What kind of plans you have in for your near future when it comes to Älymystö, movies?

Right now I’m working on two feature films – Jeremiah Harm, a scifi actioner and Iron Sky sequel. There’s also talks about more films to which I’ve attached my ass to, one of them being I Killed Adolf Hitler, then there’s Deadrise and a bunch of others.

What makes you happy?

Right now, Oranssi Pazuzu. In general, when I’m right and people listen to me and things click. What makes me sad is when I’m wrong but people still listen to me and things fall apart. Both happen at equal intervals.

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Thank you for the interview, Timo!

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Related:

Iron Sky official webpage.

Iron Sky in Facebook.

Älymystö.

– – –

Iron Siitoin.

Reich of the Black Sun.

We come in peace.

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Boyd Rice 2012. Photo: Mute Records.

I had my first contact with Boyd Rice in the early 90’s after hearing his appearance in Bob Larson’s radio show. I wrote a letter to Boyd (there were no emails or internet in general use back then) who replied and kindly sent me a copy of Abraxas newsletter.

Years passed. The last year Boyd declared that the Church of Satan was dead. Soon after that I made an interview with Larry Wessel who had made a documentary film called Iconoclast about Boyd. At this point I was already thinking that an interview with Boyd would be great and the idea was cooking up.

Finally, after some 20 years since my first contact with Boyd, I contacted him again. He was fine about an interview to the blog and I started to make questions. The interview was made one question at a time over some two months. When the interview began I had no idea about Boyd’s upcoming gig in Helsinki, Finland – that created a whole new dimension to the interview!

In the interview Boyd talks about his current projects, the Church of Satan, Anton LaVey, Bob Larson, Iconoclast, pranks, reincarnation, Scandinavia, ABBA, Finland, architect Eero Saarinen and many other things.

Without further ado, ladies and gentlemen, Boyd Rice speaks!

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Present

Hi Boyd, how are you doing?

I couldn’t be better. Just redecorated my apartment and painted my black walls metallic silver. It took weeks, but it’s amazing! Life is good. My girlfriend is moving in with me and we’re making room for her shoes.

If this interview could take place anywhere, anytime, where would you take us to talk?

I used to know a french scholar who had the keys to Jean Cocteaus apartment in Paris, and it hadn’t been touched since Cocteau died and this guy really wanted me to see it. That would be the fetishistic fantasy place. Unfortunately this guy got some deadly disease and ended up killing himself. So I guess my modern answer would be my own apartment here in Denver. Or perhaps The Madonna Inn.

There is a new book out from you, Twilight Man. Tell us about the book, what is it about, where to get a copy?

It is about my life in 80’s San Francisco and how I came to develop a sense of “cultural pessimism”, I guess. It hasn’t gotten a bad review insofar as I know. People find it a fun read, even though it is ugly and brutal.

You can get it on the internet or just ask God for a copy…

There is also a biography under work about you. Who is the author, when can we expect to get the book into our hands?

Nina Antonia. Her Johnny Thunders bio is being made into a movie in Hollywood, so maybe someday when I’m dead there will be a movie too. We can hope…

Talking a bit more about books, you are one of the authors who have been ripped off by Creation Books. What do you think, will there be any chance of getting “James Williamson” to court to face justice for the fraud he has committed?

I seriously doubt it.

What is the most interesting book you have read lately? Why it was interesting?

The last book I read was the Nina Antonia bio of Johnny Thunders. It was interesting because his life was interesting and because Nina’s a great writer and brings a lot of insight to her subject-matter.

– – –

Boyd with Anton LaVey. Photo: Carl Abrahamsson.

Church of Satan

How your first meeting with past Anton LaVey went? Where did you meet, any special jokes, wisdoms, or other notes about the meeting to share with us?

Anton met me at a film festival I was associated with and invited me to his house. I went over the following week and went back every week until I left the city. The stories he told me are all in his bio, which was essentially dictated to Blanche as he told them to me.

You wrote the last year a text where you declared yourself a High Priest of the Church of Satan and in the same text you also declared that the Church of Satan doesn’t exist anymore. This naturally caused some talk. I haven’t seen any reply from the Church to you regarding the text anywhere but I guess you have been receiving some feedback privately. What kind of feedback you have received? Has Peter H. Gilmore said anything about your text?

Of course not. Gilmore is a pussy. Everyone in the C.o.S. loves me and are bored to death of him and he knows it. Anton had a very dark heart and it sickens me to see people whitewash him and present his creed as pure rationalism. He was larger than that.

Rationalism and mysticism cannot co-exist. The latter speaks to soul oriented values and to the unknown (which man is trying to fathom). The former is a conceit that lets man think he has a handle on everything (he doesn’t). I would go so far as to say rationalism is the ultimate lack of logic. It certainly has no place in “occult” doctrine.

I think it’s easy for Gilmore to misrepresent LaVey because he didn’t really know him too well. I was at the Blackhouse all the time.

I think it’s easy for Gilmore to misrepresent LaVey because he didn’t really know him too well. I was at the Blackhouse all the time. That’s why I will defend Anton till the day I die, and that’s why I take the stance I do on the modern C.o.S…

I heard from a scholar of comparative religions the last year that Gilmore works or has been working in a Walmart, in a not so high position, while holding the status of the High Priest of the Church of Satan. I think there is nothing that special in someone working in a Walmart per se, but if someone is a High Priest of a church that is, or gives an impression of being, all about “might is right” and power in this world, this seems a bit amusing. Do you know if the claim is true? What kind of thoughts this brings to your mind in general?

I seriously doubt that is true, but a lot of people with a power philosophy have to punch a time-clock, that’s just the nature of the world. At least they have the notion of rising above that and in time perhaps they will. But anyone wishing to criticise Gilmore needn’t tell lies about his job… but rather point out how he’s bastardizing ASLV’s thought.

What do you think Anton would think of Gilmore and others who run the Church of Satan nowadays? What would he say to them?

Much what he said to me when he was still alive – that they were what Stalin called “useful idiots”. He’d hate people trying to cast him in a “good light”. He often said to me that he wondered why Satanists wanted to present him as a Good Guy. “I’m not a good guy” he would yell, “I’m a miserable sonofabitch!” That’s the LaVey I knew.

And he was much darker, very much darker than anyone is willing to admit these days. He was brutal to the max. That’s why I still love him so much… he was maybe the last unapologetic figure of the 20th century.

Whether LaVey agreed or not Satanism was a cult of personality. C.o.S. sans LaVey is like fascism without Mussolini… and a cult of personality requires someone who has a personality. It currently lacks that.

Whether LaVey agreed or not Satanism was a cult of personality. C.o.S. sans LaVey is like fascism without Mussolini… and a cult of personality requires someone who has a personality. It currently lacks that.

I think LaVey’s big mistake was to violate one of his primary directives… to assume others are like unto you and capable of the same things as you are. And they’re not. Elitism is not something you should mass-market. You can of course and it will be very successful. But it will never work out. That to me, with certain notable exceptions, is The Church of Satan today. I hope this will be my last commentary on all this. And I’d be willing to bet they wish the same!

What do you think of satanism nowadays? Has it lost its potential it once had? Do you still consider yourself a satanist – or is there nowadays a better, more updated term to describe the same individual spirit?

I rarely ever “think of satanism” unless asked about it in interviews. But since you asked, I think it is fundamentally flawed in certain of it’s basic premises. I don’t agree with the primacy of individualism any more than I believe that all men were created equal. If individualism existed (which I seriously doubt) I’m not sure what function it would serve. This was an idea which had great appeal in the post-50’s decade of conformity, but has since then not produced much of value in real world terms — more especially in the C.o.S. where it is a fundamental principle. And within that group everyone dresses alike, speaks alike and thinks alike… all based on a mass-market paperback from, what, 40-some years ago?! Am I missing something?

I rarely ever “think of satanism” unless asked about it in interviews. But since you asked, I think it is fundamentally flawed in certain of it’s basic premises.

By the way, I said much the same thing to LaVey when he was still alive, and he had to concur with me. He found it rather depressing. His exact words were “I’ve created a monster”.

– – –

Iconoclast and things involved

Larry Wessel made a lenghty documentary Iconoclast about you that came out the last year. What do you think of the film?

Four hours of me me me has got to be great by anyones standards. But again, it was an attempt to whitewash me and present me as Mr. Fun. That is part of the story, but not the whole story. But most people seemed to like it.

I noticed that you bought and used in the film some nasal snuss. What is your favorite brand? How about the regular “under-your-lip”-type of snuss that you can get f.e. in Sweden and Norway?

I like Gawith Apricot Snuff, Dr. Rumneys, & McCrystals Violet Snuff. Don’t care for chewing tobacco or dental snuff.

I also like Al Capones Vanilla Snuff, which I’ve only ever found in the Leipzig train station.

One of the things that comes to mind from the film is the great spectrum of things where you have been involved with artistically and otherwise over the years. Is there something that you still would have liked been included in the film or excluded from it?

I’m not particularly bothered either way. That film is from two years ago at least and not me or anyone remembers what was or wasn’t in it. At least it wasn’t boring.

One of the more surprising things in the film were your thougths about reincarnation – you said in your talk with Bob Larson that you consider nowadays that a reincarnation might be possible. Do you still think that way? What has made you to consider that reincarnation might be possible?

I’ve always known things that I’ve never been taught. At a very young age my son said to me “when you were a child I was a man, now I’m a child and you’re my father”. This seemed quite odd to me at the time. When I visited my fathers sister a week later I told her of this conversation, and showed her a picture of my son. She said that the strange red marks my son was born with on his nose were identical to the scars on my grandfathers nose that he got when his model T truck was driven over a cliff. This sort of thing is very common in tales of reincarnation. As a child I had very specific memories of things and places I had never experienced. When I asked my parents why I had these memories they told me they were probably only dreams, but I knew they weren’t.

I’ve always known things that I’ve never been taught.

I still think ideas like genetic memory or ancestral recall are valid, at least in some cases, but my actual theories about reincarnation are too complex to explain in a format like this.

Bob Larson is featured in the film among many other persons. Your encounter with him in the film is pretty different from the early 90’s radio shows where he interviewed you. Has your view of Bob changed during this time? Do you think Bob really believes in the stuff he talks about or is he really like P.T. Barnum, as you once stated in his radio show?

Bob has been extremely consistent ever since he published his first book, in around 1970 or something. I don’t think you can fake something like that for over 40 years. I met his father one time and he was a True Believer. Of course Bob is a showman and understands how to play his audience. So was Anton LaVey… and P. T. Barnum. Nothing wrong with that!

What do you think of teenage girl exorcists Bob has apparently trained into the job? Is Bob a little bit dirty old man or is this just about the showman part you mentioned?

I think it’s pure showmanship. But it would make a good premise for a TV show — a sort or christian Charlies Angels.

In the film you tell about some of the pranks you have done, for example the famous goat head prank. What do you consider as your best pranks ever? Who are your favorite pranksters alive nowdays?

We snuck into a good friends house and left a bottle of maple syrup in his refrigeratator. It came in a bottle shaped like an old woman, and the incident totally freaked him out. He began carrying a gun with him everywhere the very next day. But the best pranks are when you draw someone into an absurd world of your own making and your fantasy becomes their reality, even if just for a short time. Therefore, the best pranksters now are mainstream politicians because that is their full time job. They are the best, because they’re the best conmen, but not necessarily my favorites.

– – –

Scandinavia, ABBA, Finland and the future

NON gave a live show in Norway the last year. How was it? 

It was great. A lot of people from Finland traveled there to see it and a lot came to my show at The Roundhouse in London. I am looking forward to my visit there. See you soon.

You are an ABBA fan. What’s cool about ABBA? Do you have a big ABBA collection?

I have enough obscure ABBA songs that I could put together an entire album… songs that the band didn’t really release because they considered them imperfect or too weird. But of course the worst ABBA song is better than the best songs from a lot of bands. I wanted to cover them and put out an album called ABBA LEAD (as opposed to ABBA GOLD). I pitched the idea to Rose McDowall, but she didn’t seem interested. Shame… because that could have been huge.

The worst ABBA song is better than the best songs from a lot of bands.

That is a shame, indeed! Maybe she will change her mind about the project one day… I think you would make a fabulous cover of “Waterloo” and “Does your mother know” with maybe a bit changed lyrics. What do you think of this in addition of making covers of ABBA’s more obscure songs?

Don’t ask. None of this will ever happen anyway.

You are going to have a concert in Helsinki on 6th of November this year. This is the first time you’ll have a concert in Finland. What are you expecting and hoping from your visit here? How long you’ll stay here, any places you plan to visit, etc.? What kind of associations Finland brings to your mind?

I met people in London who flew all the way from Finland to see my show at the Roundhouse, and more people in Norway who did the same. So I’m looking forward to my trip there and have wanted to see it for a long time.

I recently met the daughter of Saarinen, and found out there is some sort of Saarinen museum just outside Helsinki… I’d love to see that and anything connected with the man or his family. He’s my favorite architect.

What kind of projects you are working with nowadays? What can we expect from you in some near future?

Most of this year I’ve been working on a book of my art for a British publisher — paintings, photos, montages & graphic design. It’s nearly done. Later this year a number of my essays are coming out in Outre Journal out of Australia. I also just filmed some scenes for Richard Wolstencroft’s new film The Second Coming, which is based on the poem by William Butler Yeats. I just returned from NYC where I spent time in the studio recording some new stuff. So I keep busy…

What makes you happy?

Animals make me happy… prairie dogs, foxes, squirrels and cats… coatis, bunnies, capybaras and kiwis.

But I still love consternation. I still love pissing people off. I love knowing that my very existence causes certain people great discomfort. And they deserve it… in spades!

– – –

Thank you for the interview, Boyd!

Boyd Rice will perform at Kuudes Linja in Helsinki on 6th of November. You can buy tickets to the concert from Tiketti. Facebook page for the event can be found from here.

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Related links:

Boyd Rice/NON official webpage.

Boyd Rice/NON official Facebook page.

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Related previous posts:

Boyd Rice live at Kuudes linja, Helsinki, 6th November.

Church of Satan is dead.

Boyd Rice: An Embodiment of the Wolf’s Hook.

Larry Wessel speaks!

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Boyd Rice: An Embodiment of the Wolf’s Hook

As many of you know, I wrote an article “Church of Satan is dead” some time ago. That article got me in touch with a documentary movie maker Larry Wessel, who’s interview “Larry Wessel speaks!” I then made. Wessel’s latest movie, Iconoclast, was six years in making. The result is a four hour long ride that goes through Boyd Rice’s life in three parts. This includes a good deal of history of pop culture and art too. After watching the movie I knew I wanted to write a review of it. However, after reading Carl Abrahamsson’s excellent review I thought I would have nothing to add to what he had said, because he put it all so well. You can find Abrahamsson’s review from here. Well, I thougth I could still write something about the documentary. If nothing else, I could write down my notes of the contents of the film and some of my rambling notes in between. What follows might be boring reading as it pretty much just lists the contents of the film. For those who are interested in Boyd’s art, life, and persona and have not seen the film yet, my notes and ramblings might still be interesting. So, with this note, or warning, let me begin.

Part One: Lemon Grove

Part one of the movie starts with Boyd reading his poem Secrets:

That is most powerful which remains unknown

Except unto you, and to you alone

There are secrets that slumber behind these eyes

And I stand by my secrets, my truths and my lies

There are secrets that soar where the eagle flies

Above man’s truths and beyond his lies

There are secrets that slither like snakes in the night

Coiled in shadows, far distant from light

There are secrets that confront you in the midday sun

Yet remain unknown to everyone

A secret burns bright when its law is obeyed

But is doomed to fade when that law is betrayed

For that is most powerful which remains unknown

Except unto you, and to you alone.

It seems to me that in some poetical way the ethos of this poem carries through the whole documentary. I don’t know Boyd but it seems to me that the poem carries the spirit that is present in all that Boyd has done and what he is like. He is difficult to label, he is multidimensional. He is often labeled this and that, often as something sinister and suspicious. But the truth probably lies somewhere between the lines, one could say between the opposites. I was reminded already at this point of the film of the wolf’s hook rune and how it really well seems to symbolize the essence of Boyd and his work.

After that Bob Larson does exorcism, Boyd goes to a tobacco store and buys a whole box of Samuel Gawith snuff. Wait! Is that that nasal tobacco? Yes it is, you can see Boyd taking it later in the film, in part three of the documentary, at the Absinthe studios. I have never tried nasal snuff, but I enjoy a lot the kind of snuss (especially portioned General) that you can buy in Sweden (I am having one portion under my lip right now while writing this).

A family history follows. A whole bunch of old pics. A story of a neighbohour average man’s everyday routine and how Boyd decided he will never be like that. We hear of a tv prank and a good deal of a tiki-culture. Already at this point my idea of Boyd starts to get new dimensions. I did not know that much of his interest in tiki and of things related. My idea of Boyd had previously been formed pretty much through some of his NON-recordings and his association with the Church of Satan. I think I am not the only one  like that. Much more interesting new dimensions to Boyd and his works is about to follow. This is getting really interesting.

We hear what happened in 1969. We hear of a Dark Shadows character who said: “Two natures have always existed in man, one good the other evil, perhaps with this we can bridge the gap in man’s divided nature”. Boyd comments on this: “And like a portal opened in my soul”. I am again reminded of the wolf’s hook rune and its essence. It is becoming apparent that the symbol has found a resonance within Boyd very early and that he has ever since worked to unfold the symbol’s mystery.

“Two natures have always existed in man, one good the other evil, perhaps with this we can bridge the gap in man’s divided nature”.

We hear of Strange paradise. We hear of Anton LaVey, Charles Manson, and Tiny Tim – how they were totally different and still much alike. We hear a story about Martin Denny. We hear a story about a man who lost his keys in Italy and found them from Florida. We hear about decadent Hollywood and its coolness. Rodney Bingenheimer. Glamrock. Principal in a nazi uniform poster prank. We hear a story about Boyd making a life size cross in high school and his work at Taco Bell – and of eating a moth there every now and then. Bean-qhr-qwr-qhr. We hear about how to make photos of things that does not exist, St. Jean Cocteau and Captain Beefheart’s nightly calls. Then Boyd tells about dada, surrealism, alchemy. I like it all, I can totally relate to what I hear. An image of Boyd as an artist starts to surface, an image that is new to me. The guy starts to get more and more interesting, minute by minute.

Boyd tells us how “women like it weird”. He tells us of his open-ended paintings, and again the wolf’s hook rune comes to my mind. The principle is there again. Skinned sheep’s head gift to the first lady is pure gold. A priceless prank, instant art performance. Next we hear how Boyd was living dada real. Steve Hitchcock illuminates us about how magic and alchemy is part of what Boyd does: “Boyd was someone who introduced me to the idea of alchemy of thought, where by you take negative or valueless proposition and turn it to your own advantage, by sort of inverted perception of it, which can be done, it takes a disciplined mind, a disciplined mentality if you want to make use of that, but it certainly is a valid principle”. Do you see the wolf’s hook and its principle at work again here? I do.

We hear of Boyd meeting Genesis P-Orridge. We hear of 1977 and the famous The Black Album, Boyd’s deal with Mute records, the birth of NON, and why punk was just glam rock with harder edge. Next we hear of something in which Boyd was again ahead of the time: Pagan muzak record that can be played with different speeds. This happened years, years ago. The first time I heard of such a record was when Butthole Surfers’ Hairway to Steven came out in 1988. Before of that I had for my own amusement listened to lots of records with different speeds – pretty much with the perspective of “open-ended paintings” of which Boyd spoke about earlier in the documentary. You can find the same thing interesting with different angles, perspectives. Things are most of the time not black and white, but composed of many colors and shades.

Who invented tape-loops? It was Boyd. He tells us how nothing in the world is fixed. We hear of “the world’s weirdest record”. We hear of the first NON show, which was “louder than Led Zeppelin”. There is a note of music as sounds, not so much as songs. Iitywimwybmad. Roto-guitar. Stuff ahead of the time. Live sounds from that part of the documentary remind me of some amazing underground noise gigs that I attended at Some Place Else in Turku, South-West of Finland around 2004 and 2005. Boyd did that kind of stuff about 30 years earlier. I find that rather impressive.

Part two: San Francisco

Part two of the movie deals with Boyd’s years in San Francisco area. We hear of Incredible strange films and research involved. Director Ray Dennis Steckler is revealed to be also actor Cash Flagg. The amazing scopitone machines are introduced. Boyd tells us of “close-ups of tits shaking a few seconds too long” and girls doing dances in bright colors. Sounds and looks good to me.

Then comes something I knew there was going to be covered, Boyd’s association with Anton LaVey. “Living in San Francisco it was inevitable that our paths would cross”. Blanche Barton tells about getting to know Boyd and why Boyd and Anton got so well along. “Role of the Devil has to be… one that challenges”. Barton also tells that Boyd also understood the trickster, prankster side of satanism… which is something that not everyone understands. Coop, the artist, tells about “making it hot for them”… and that “of course that applies to Boyd, perfectly”. We hear of Blinky the friendly hen’s funeral and resurrection. Vampire aesthetics. There is a note about romance and cultured gentleman in a vampire – and how below that side is a beast. A perfect wolf’s hook principle at work again.

Stanton LaVey, Anton LaVey’s more known daughter’s son, appears briefly in the film too. His first sentence in the film is “Boyd did fuck my mother!” which is followed with a warm laugh. He clearly has positive thoughts of Boyd. It seems that Boyd has had much warmer relationship with Zeena than I had. Back in the late 90’s and early 2000 I met Zeena few times, corresponded with her and it was an ongoing argument. Zeena and her husband Nikolas thought that I was trying to put too much love into the left hand path. They even called me “Jesus of darkness”. But that is another story.

Beth Moore-Love is an artist who I was not familiar with earlier. We see some of her amazing paintings. She says of Boyd: “He’s very intelligent. I like people who not only think outside of the box, but outside of the entire packeting industry… Boyd is one of them”. Boyd tells a chilling story of San Francisco’s Chinatown and its rats. It is very easy to believe. I lived in the city for some time in 2004 and Chinatown was one of my favorite places there. I visited it quite often and wondered about the smell of the place. Rats fit in the picture well.

“He’s very intelligent. I like people who not only think outside of the box, but outside of the entire packeting industry… Boyd is one of them”.

Next Boyd tells us how all the women who he brought to LaVey’s house had the next night a dream of having sex with LaVey. Boyd tells of LaVey’s different alter egos, the crime boss, the china man, and how LaVey could keep with a role for hours. The stories are hilarious and Boyd cracks up telling them. To readers of LaVey’s works it comes as no surprise that LaVey was living in a sort of alternative reality or realities he chose to live in. We hear very interesting angles on the subject. The famous Johnson & Smith’s catalogue is covered, and how “consternation” is the word related to it. Whoopee cushion. Remote controlled fart machine. How Anton programmed his keyboard with different fart sounds. The movie has been very fun already from the beginning, not just at this point. Barton tells how she and Boyd got Anton to record his music. It is very much likely that without them there would be no recorded music of LaVey.

Then comes the part dealing with Charles Manson. “Two minutes after meeting him he is giving me this you-are-me-and-I-am-you -routine”. Boyd tells us how Manson has one feet in the world of a fantasy, another in reality. We hear a story of Charlie telling to Boyd about taking a helicopter and visiting Ajatollah Khomeini. We hear that there are secrets Manson has told to Boyd – and which Boyd has promised to not tell to anyone while Manson is still alive (this reminds me of Boyd’s poem Secrets, with which the movie begins). Why Boyd got in touch with Manson in the first place? Why he seems to have interest in individuals who have been labeled very “sinister”? Some of Boyd’s associates gives a perspective on this: “Boyd has always been sort of attracted to those people who disrupt society in some way, that cause, that show the limitations of what we pretend to be civilized, I don’t want to put words into Boyd’s mouth but I know that’s part of what attracts him to this stuff”. I think this is a good angle to the question. The documentary gives a broad context where one can reflect on that. I think the documentary also gives an idea of the wolf’s hook rune, its essence and principle in artistic action – pursued by a questioning mind that does not see things in black and white but as “an open ended paintings”. Things are not fixed. In his pursuit Boyd is not afraid of putting himself in positions where he can easily get misunderstood. He is not so much afraid of social pressure as most of the people are.  Such a courage in looking at the human equation is hardly a bad thing. I would rather argue that seeing things in black and white is a bad thing. Finally, we hear of how Manson got into a solitary confinement for two weeks because of a bullet that happened to be in Boyd’s pocket – and how that ruined their relationship.

“Boyd has always been sort of attracted to those people who disrupt society in some way, that cause, that show the limitations of what we pretend to be civilized, I don’t want to put words into Boyd’s mouth but I know that’s part of what attracts him to this stuff”.

Then the documentary comes to the symbol that I’ve already mentioned few times, the wolf’s hook rune. We hear of the balance point between creation and destruction, “exactly the meaning that has been the guiding force in my life”. Adam Parfrey enters the picture – the guy is “on the same wavelenght “with Boyd. We are informed about the Apocalypse culture, 8-8-88 at Strand Theatre, San Francisco. We hear of the nazi accusations Boyd has been thrown with. “Boyd was not, is not, and will never be a nazi… you could take it as seriously as the Producers movie”. Anyone who has watched the documentary thus far must agree with that.  To say that Boyd is a nazi is absurd. We hear about the victim culture that likes to whine about everything. We learn of a mexican poster and ABBA-book that was stolen from Boyd (whoa – I did not know that Boyd likes ABBA. I have always liked them too. In my article “Church of Satan is dead” I pondered how much common ground I might have with Boyd. It seems there is much more than I thought). The San Francisco part of the movie ends with a story of Boyd moving to Denver. We hear why the place is cool. We hear that the building Boyd lives in was built in 1890. We hear how Boyd had a Carnival of souls welcome to Denver.

“Boyd was not, is not, and will never be a nazi… You could take it as seriously as the Producers movie”.

Part three: Denver

Part three deals with Boyd’s time in Denver and the stuff he has done since moving there. There is a recording session at Absinthe studios. Fredrik Nilsen gives another perspective on Boyd that tells of his wolf’s hook nature and approach to things: “He is a scholar of evil. He’s not evil. In fact, he’s a very sweet, loving, guy. But he seems to have an incredible knowledge of the nature of evil and he seems to be willing to chronicle and look at it in a sort of… empirical way, I’m not sure it is empirical… aesthetic way. And I think he is pretty great”. We see a footage of Boyd’s guest lecture “Regarding evil” at Massachusetts institute of technology. We hear of Oswald Mosley and his ralleys – and how his symbolism influenced Throbbing Gristle and David Bowie. We hear how Marilyn Manson (who has called Boyd his mentor) also used the Mosley symbolism after Boyd noted to him about it and about “a cross between glam rock and Nürenberg rally”. We hear about how to manipulate archetypes – how to step into a role you want to be in and how it then flows into you. There is a funny anti-fascism demonstrators talk with Boyd. After that there starts a really interesting part where Bob Larson talks with Boyd. He says with a big smile: “Bob has been working with me for the past 14 years… he doesn’t give up”. Boyd’s sense of humor is great and a watcher of the documentary is blessed with tons of it.

“He is a scholar of evil. He’s not evil. In fact, he’s a very sweet, loving, guy. But he seems to have an incredible knowledge of the nature of evil and he seems to be willing to chronicle and look at it in a sort of… empirical way, I’m not sure it is empirical… aesthetic way. And I think he is pretty great”.

We hear of the Partridge family & Partridge family temple: “Our religion is based on fun”. We hear of archetypes on TV. Giddle Partridge speaks. A story of Boyd as a catholic priest “blessing” kids rosery beads is pure prankster Boyd. Gidget Gein speaks how his idea of Boyd went up and down. The subject of social darwinism is touched upon. Another angle to wolf’s hook is given: Abraxas – an entity that is good and evil at the same time. We learn that Boyd has Charles Manson’s copy of the Bible. Bob Larson tells Boyd that “maybe you need an exorcism”. Boyd and Bob talk about paradigms of reality, good and evil. All in a very good spirit, pretty different from what it was like in Bob Larson’s radio show in the early 90’s. Boyd tells about Might is Right by Ragnar Redbeard and about Lions Lair and women who got spontaneously naked for him there. We hear of Tiny Tim and his phonecalls, talk about women. Nutcase letters LaVey got. LaVey’s guns. We hear a hilarious prank that Boyd did with “Got milk?”-campaign’s billboard that featured David Copperfield. The billboard had  a picture of Copperfield’s face with some milk on his upper lip and a text saying “What’s the magic word? Calsium”. Boyd changed “Calsium” with some paint into ”Cum”. I once made a similar prank with Canal plus billboard… maybe you guess what I painted it to be? Margaret Radnick tells about Boyd’s love letters to her. Boyd’s friendship with Rozz Williams is covered. Douglas P. tells an amazing story about nazi-monkeys attacking old German men with bananas. Boyd’s bar Tiki-Boyd as an alternative reality is covered.

The talk between Boyd and Bob Larson continues. If there has been lots of interesting, even surprising turns in the film thus far, it gets even more such at this point. Boyd and Bob talk about some kind of possibility to survive death, and Boyd even tells that he nowadays thinks that some kind of reincarnation of consciousness might be possilbe. Bob comments: “You may have to turn back your Church of Satan card!” Boyd: “I tried and they wouldn’t take it!” Bob: “What happened to your old misanthropic idea of things? Obviously you must have mellowed in your hatred for humanity”. Boyd: “I’m still fairly misanthropic, I just don’t think I’m not actively misanthropic. Because I’m a very happy individual and I just find it if I treat everybody with a certain degree of civility they usually treat me with civility so generally they’ve used to people treating rotly and when somebody comes along who is nice to them it is big change for them and I gotta see the best sides of everybody if I treat everybody decently and they in turn are nice to me”. Bob says back in amazement: “Do you realize what you just said? You have just recited a part of Sermon of the Mount. You have just articulated one of the most important ethics that Jesus taught! Do unto others as you would have them to do unto you”. Bob continues: “At least you’re not at this point trying to bring back Thor and declare total war!” Boyd says smilingly: “Yea, I need to change the lyrics…” We hear “People” with improvised lyrics. The movie ends with Boyd’s poem, just like it started. The ending poem is Boyd’s Gift:

On my own

Hour after hour

Sipping cocktails

And reading Schopenhauer

Living in a world

Without imagination

I see that hope

Is a lack of information

I turn my back

I shut the door

I lock the key

A prisoner in my home

But it’s lovely to be free.

After that we hear Boyd singing Terry Jacks’ Seasons in the Sun. The film ends.

As I said, the movie is multidimensional. It covers a lot. It is funny as hell. It is thought provoking. It is surprising. It gives a picture of Boyd that one might not expect. Anton LaVey said once that “Boyd is a true iconoclast” and one cannot but agree. As it has most likely become clear, I would like to add that Boyd is an embodiment of the wolf’s hook rune, the symbol he has carried with him since his childhood.

Larry Wessel has made one hell of a film and I highly recommend it to everyone who is even cursorily interested in Boyd and his art. This documentary is a classic.

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I was going through my archives some time ago and found a handwritten letter from Boyd Rice to me. It’s from the early 90’s when I still considered myself a satanist. I was in my late teens. In the letter he replied to some of my questions regarding his appearance in Bob Larson’s radio show, made some notes about Music, martinis and misanthrophy CD, the Abraxas Foundation (he kindly sent me its newsletter WAKE! ), etc. Ahead of the time, years before the internet became a commonplace, Boyd also used a smiley in the letter, much like it is used commonly nowadays. I remember it amused me. Days after digging this letter from my archives I learned that a lenghty documentary about Boyd had finally came out. Iconoclast looks like something definitely worth seeing if you are even cursorily interested in all the stuff that Boyd has done over the years. Few days after learning of the documentary, I learned that Boyd had declared himself a high priest of the Church of Satan recently and interestingly enough, he also declared that the Church of Satan didn’t exist as an organization anymore.

I moved away from satanism to other ways to contextualise and experience myself and the universe few years after receiving that letter from Boyd. Around the time I made this paradigm shift I thought that not only I was not a satanist, but I also came to the conclusion that the Church of Satan was dead. It seemed to me that the Church of Satan had lost the certain genuinely fresh and dynamic substance it once had. I thought that even if one was a satanist, not just one playing one, one should have seen that as an organization the Church of Satan was gone. Even if you were a satanist you should have come up with something new carrying the genuine spark that made the Church of Satan what it once was. The organization was attracting all too much certain kind of pompous airheads and (post) teen-angst filled guys who made it look like that the whole LaVeyan satanism had become more a certain kind of aesthetic and attitude promoting subculture and lifestyle than a practical philosophy that could be taken seriously. Just looking how these guys were repeating LaVey’s words year after year word by word instead of developing the basic philosophy and its implications and making individually something really out of it in the world all spoke (and still speak) for itself to me. It didn’t (and still doesn’t) look very much like satanic individualism at its best to me. It all looks like Anton LaVey fan club with its members, and as such not essentially very different from other kinds of fan clubs.

There are of course exceptions, not all who associate themselves in one way or another with LaVeyan satanism are such airheads. But such persons seem to be rather rare. Boyd Rice has always appeared to me as one of those exceptions. He is smart, creative, complex, and in his own way he has seemed to truly practise satanism in his own individual way. No matter that my worldview is quite different from his, his works have continued to interest me because he has not been parroting LaVey but he has being doing his own thing.  It has been thought provoking and fun to see what he has been doing. The declaration that Boyd made recently affirmed that again.

I haven’t seen or heard an official comment from the Church of Satan to Boyd’s declaration yet. It might be that they have a difficult time thinking how to formulate a good answer to it. Among other things Boyd’s declaration includes this note: “True LaVeyan Satanism only exists insofar as it is manifested in deeds – in life and living. Never in mere words”. If the current “high priest” of the Church of Satan, Peter H. Gilmore, works or has been working in a not very high position at Wal-Mart while being a high priest of an organization that likes to give an impression that its higher degree members are in positions of power in the world, it might be difficult for him to reply to that note from Boyd. One academic scholar has indeed made that claim about Gilmore and Wal-Mart, I’ve heard, but I am not sure if it is true or not. Interestingly enough, there is not much information around how Gilmore makes his living.  I think there is nothing wrong or laughable about working at Wal-Mart per se, except if you happen to be a high priest of an organization that is all about might is right and exemplifying that  in the world. But well, maybe Gilmore is indeed in some position of power that matches with the nature of being a high priest of Satan, an entity emphatically of power in this material world. In any case, Gilmore gives an impression of having common sense and sense of humor in his interviews. He doesn’t seem like an airhead. It will be interesting to see what he will eventually reply to Boyd’s declaration.

When it comes to Boyd’s view of the world it is quite a bit more nihilistic and misanthropic than mine. I don’t share too much with Boyd’s view of the world, except that most of the people are idiots. The difference between me and Boyd seems to lie mostly in that I have more empathy towards people, idiots, but it might be that’s because I find an idiot pretty much from everybody. Myself included. I also do write a blog which is something Boyd would apparently never do. Nevertheless, I am not a mere blogger, I have done and do stuff out there in the world in my own small way, as some of you know. Anyway, words on screen are out of total living context. It might be that talking about all and everything with Boyd over a pint there could surface more common ground between me and Boyd than mere words on screen would indicate. I’d like to see if this is so. So, Boyd, if you happen to be around Finland sometime, I invite you to have  few beers with me. I’d offer. I agree with you about the main message of your declaration and would like to interview you about it.

Below is the declaration I’ve talked about. It’s worth reading thoughtfully if LaVeyan satanism interests you (be sure to have proper background music while reading it).

– – –

To whom it may concern,

As it is widely known, Anton Szandor LaVey repeatedly expressed his sincere desire to me that his mantle as leader of the Church of Satan pass to me upon his death. In his estimation, I was the sole person qualified to carry his tradition into a new era. At the time I demurred, explaining that I was a loner and not a team player or a people person.

Now I have changed my mind. After thirteen years of introspection, I have decided to step up to the plate and humbly accept the role bestowed upon me by my close friend and mentor. Why? Because remaining loyal to LaVey’s spirit and memory has come at the cost of distancing myself from the organization perpetuating itself in his name.

At one time, the sycophants and functionaries at the forefront of the CoS may have been called apparatchiks or pencil pushers. Today they are bloggers, whose sole arena of combat is the internet. When they employ “satanic” ideals, it’s in endless squabbles in cyberspace – rarely in real life or the real world. The LaVey I knew abhorred such types, and frequently told me as much.

I am told that many in the Church of Satan were offended by my book NO, and particularly by my essay on individuality; which they perceived as a potshot taken at them. How very perceptive – it was exactly that! If Anton were alive to read the text, he’d agree wholeheartedly; and laugh his ass off. He often lamented to me that his ideas vis-à-vis individualism were misguided and that he’d in effect “given birth to a monster”; or that such ideas applied to a few rare souls and not to everyone with the price of admission.

Consequently, my first official act as new leader and only truly ordained High Priest of the Church of Satan is to declare that the organization no longer exists. True LaVeyan Satanism only exists insofar as it is manifested in deeds – in life and living. Never in mere words. Elitism is self-defining, it is not a commodity that can be bought or sold for a few hundred dollars, or whatever the going rate is for a little, red membership card.

In the future, LaVey’s ideas can only survive in so much as they constitute a living reality, and never as mere platitudes on the printed page or computer screen; and in the future, such ideas must be taken to the next level. They must be recognized as purely foundational. Not an end point, but a starting point. LaVey expressed as much to me when he appointed me Grand Master of The Order of the Trapezoid. Satanism is an initiation into the wisdom of materiality, and the trapezoid represents the mastering of materiality – the pyramid sans its keystone. It is a foundation and a beginning.

In closing, I know my words will find resonance only amongst a rare few. That’s as it should be. I am not trying to “take over” the internet orthodoxy currently known as the Church of Satan, nor would I want to. I wouldn’t touch it with a bargepole.

I am simply telling you I am Anton LaVey’s handpicked replacement as High Priest. Do with that what you will. I will not ask you for money. I will not send you newsletters or post blogs. But I will never steer you wrong, nor ever disgrace the memory of my dear friend and mentor, Anton Szandor LaVey. He lives within each soul that manifests his ideas and worldview. He will remain forever dead to those who are content to pay mere lip service to them. For the former, a new era awaits; for the latter, an old error remains in play. Let the dead bury the dead – life is for the living.

Boyd Rice

High Priest, Church of Satan

Grand Master, Order of the Trapezoid

H.S.d.

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